0 comments / Posted by Alyson McNaghten

Thanksgiving Scrub Shopper

 

Being a nurse means a lot of things. It means having a strong stomach and reacting calmly under pressure. It means maintaining that tricky combination of empathy and logic simultaneously. It means constantly attempting—and often failing—to balance a crazy work schedule with family time and self-care. It also means that you probably don't always love your job, but you still know you wouldn’t have it any other way. If you’re a nurse, or a medical professional in general, here are some things you may (or may not) be thankful for this year and every year.

 

Coffee

This may be a given, but it’s at the top of the list for a reason. We CANNOT forget to thank coffee for its constant support and reliability. You know you could not have survived nursing school and that exhausting string of night shifts with out it. I couldn’t have survived late nights memorizing anatomical diagrams, muscle origin points, and the international phonetic alphabet without it. So thanks, coffee. We appreciate you.

 

Dry Shampoo

A blessing from the gods. On days when you have to choose between sleep and proper hygiene (and you probably know all too well how real those days are), dry shampoo is your best friend. Let’s take a minute to reflect and thank this invisible soldier for all its hard work.

 

Call Light

That one patient who keeps pushing the call button. Sure, you may have an overwhelming urge to unplug the call light and run out the front door singing “The Hills Are Alive,” but let’s take a second to remember the positives here. For one, you’re getting so much exercise thanks to him. You could basically call him your new personal trainer. You don’t have time to work out anyway (or maybe you’d just rather be scribbling in adult coloring books while watching Gilmore Girls), so he gives you your daily does of cardio. It's also really great practice for when your kids are home sick and need loads of attention. You'll have built up superhuman amounts of patience by then.

 

Scrubs

Okay, I know what you’re thinking. But you’re a Scrub company, you have to say that. Fair. But honestly, biases aside, scrubs are such an essential perk of working in the medical field. Scrubs are basically functional, fluid-resistant pajamas with pockets that you get to wear to work every day. Plus you don’t have to worry about planning your outfits every day. Take it from someone who does; It’s more annoying than you might think, and I often find myself missing my high school plaid skirt and polo. Cherish the fact that you can spend less money on expensive clothes and save your favorite outfits for the weekends.

 

Rubber Gloves

AKA first chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins and inventor of rubber gloves. Rubber gloves obviously exist for necessary sanitary measure, and since they’re most likely a part of your everyday life if might be easy to overlook their worth, but OH MY GOSH can you imagine how awful your job would be without them? Code brown? Code white? Code anything? Triple gloves have been a lifesaver for you countless times, and you don’t even want to think about doing your job without them.

 

Ballpoint Pens

At the end of the day, you’ll probably have five less pens than you started with, because that's just the reality of life as a nurse... But the days when you have a full stock of new pens in your pocket are pure magic. Blue, black, green, purple—doesn't matter. You love your pens and you're not afraid to admit it. 

 

Nursing

Okay, real talk. Despite all of the annoyances of everyday nursing life, you actually love what you do. It drives you crazy some days, but you’re ultimately so thankful that you get to spend your life helping others and making the world a little less broken—literally and figuratively. Nurse life isn’t all glitz and glamour, but it’s worth it.

 


 

Wishing you the happiest of Thanksgivings, even if your holiday meal consists of a frozen turkey dinner in a box.

Turkey Dinner

(No judgement)

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